Segregating Biohazardous Waste Material for Disposal

Any company that works with biological materials will need to ensure they are properly disposing of all waste. Furthermore, items need to be segregated before disposal to make certain they are handled properly. Following are three broad categories of biohazardous waste disposal materials individuals need to be aware of to ensure they are handled correctly at all times.

Sharps

Any material that is capable of puncturing the skin and contaminating the individual with biological materials that have not been sterilized is considered a sharp. This includes razor blades, needles, and glass slides along with syringes. Any item in this category must be segregated in a sharps container right after use. The container is clearly marked for biohazard materials, features solid walls, and cannot be punctured. Furthermore, the container must be leakproof on both the bottom and sides. Do not fill the container more than three-fourths full.

Non-Sharp Solid Waste

Lab consumables that have been exposed to viable biological materials with nucleic acids fall into this category along with potentially infectious materials from a lab and clinical specimens from the lab. Gloves, pipette tips, and culture flasks that are meant to be disposed of are examples of non-sharp solid waste and must be segregated in a special container. The container is required by law to feature solid walls and be leakproof. Furthermore, the container must be lined with an autoclavable bag and include a lid with the biohazard symbol. Benchtop containers are acceptable and must be moved to the floor container when they are filled.

Liquid Waste

Any biological liquids, including bulk materials, fall into this group. Vessels used to collect the liquids must feature the biohazard label and be identified with the name of the disinfectant. Use non-breakable vessels when possible for the collection of these materials. Furthermore, any vacuum flask used in the collection of liquid biohazardous waste needs to come with an overflow flask or HEPA filter to prevent contamination in the event the flask malfunctions. Clean the vessels weekly to prevent contamination and overflow.

Contact the waste disposal provider for more information on how to deal with different types of biohazardous waste. No company wants to run afoul of the law as a result of misinformation or lack of knowledge. The right provider ensures its customers know exactly what to do with different materials and where to find information if any questions arise.